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What People Are Saying About Career Connect Washington
Maud Daudon: Expand career connected learning across the state

The Seattle Times, April 3, 2019

“If you’re a Washington business owner or manager wondering where to find skilled workers, you’re not alone. And if you’re a Washington parent or high school student, wondering how to get from school to a great job, you’re not alone either.

“You may also be the solution to each other’s problem.

“Last summer, the Career Connect Washington initiative convened groups of parents to discuss education and career preparation in Washington state. As part of a 10-year effort, we are learning how to better help students connect to both jobs and advanced education so they will be well positioned to step into the state’s job market. Business, labor and education organizations are all stepping up; we need the Legislature to act as well.”

Full article

Todd Mielke: Career Connected Learning strengthens employer-educator partnerships

The Spokesman Review, March 22, 2019

“It’s no secret that talent is a main driver in growing and retaining business in our region. However, preparing students to meet the needs of Washington employers is a challenge when, in the next five years, approximately 225,500 family-sustaining-wage jobs will require credentials, certificates or two- and four-year degrees in STEM fields.

“Part of the answer? Career Connect Washington, a system of programs that enables businesses to partner with education in developing a talent pipeline that provides awareness of, exploration in and preparation for the real business world.”

Full article

Voters agree the state should do more to expand career-connected learning opportunities

Tacoma Daily Index, March 21, 2019

“Ninety-four percent of Washington state voters agree students at every level should have access to career-connected learning opportunities like internships and youth apprenticeships and 90 percent say every child should have access to high-quality STEM education, according to a new statewide survey.

” ‘Washington voters embrace a comprehensive approach to preparing our students in STEM, from career-connected learning to early education,’ said Caroline King, chief executive officer at Washington STEM. ‘With leadership from Governor Inslee and bipartisan lawmakers, the legislature has the historic chance to take action this session to ensure all Washington state students, especially those furthest from opportunity, are prepared for the economic opportunities in our state.’ ”

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Soapbox: Combining career and classroom learning is the path to go

The Yakima Herald, March 1, 2019

“As business leaders and teachers, we know that people learn differently and work differently. And just as businesses need a diversity of skill sets, students need more than one career pathway after high school. In a recent public survey, 75 percent of Washington residents believe students need more exposure to on-the-job learning opportunities.

“Students and families are eager to combine classroom learning with work-based experiences that will help them explore their options for life after high school. Students who are provided the opportunity to “test drive” multiple careers are better able to identify the path that fits them.”

Full article

In Our View: Start today building workforce of tomorrow

The (Vancouver) Columbian, February 28, 2019

“That represents a changing reality of education in the United States. There is strong evidence that a college degree, on average, results in lifelong financial benefits. And there is strong evidence that a post-secondary degree is particularly essential in this state’s competitive job market. Seattle recently was acknowledged as the most educated of all big cities in the United States — and 8 of 10 newcomers have a college degree.

“But it is essential to note that there are various methods for receiving the necessary education. The traditional path of leaving high school for a four-year college and sitting in class while working toward a degree does not work for everybody. Neither does beginning an entry-level job while hoping to eventually work your way up in a burgeoning industry.”

Full article

Preparing for Workforce of Tomorrow by linking education, business

The (Vancouver) Columbian, February 15, 2019

“The manufacturing technician ‘Career Launch’ pilot … offers a $12- to $14-an-hour paid apprenticeship at SEH of 25 to 28 hours a week and Clark College tuition covered by the company en route to a technician certification.

“If the apprentice successfully completes the program, a likely position awaits as a full-time SEH technician with median pay of $27 an hour. The company also offers a tuition reimbursement program for an associate degree and other post-secondary education pursuits.

“This is the type of corporate and education behavior that would be encouraged and rewarded under legislation being considered in Olympia and backed by Gov. Jay Inslee’s administration. Called “career-connected learning,” the legislation would offer financial incentives for schools to increase enrollment in career launch programs, create career-connected learning programs and hire people who would work as coordinators between companies and community colleges to ensure students are leaving with job-ready skills.”

Full article

Scott Morris and Mike Brown: How do you get there from here? Career Connect Washington

The Spokesman Review, February 3, 2019

“It’s sometimes hard to remember how hard the “What do you want to be when you grow up?” question is. The follow-up question is even harder: “How are you going to get there?”

“We know that young people don’t always have the answers, but they are curious and eager to explore their options. They want to learn about different careers and what mix of experience and classroom learning is needed to do those jobs. They are excited about their next steps, but also cautious about challenges like educational debt.

“We’ve spent time getting to know the young people in our community, while they spent time getting to know Avista and what it takes to keep the lights on.”

Full article

Student Perspective: Career-connected learning: Finding a path to the future without fear

Wenatchee World, January 25, 2019

“The Career & Technical Education (CTE) clubs that incorporate career-connected learning have given me a picture of what I need to do to get where I want to be and connected me with people in the community that can help me meet my goals….

“I’m interested in pursuing a career in corporate law and connecting with college admissions representatives and ambassadors helped me to understand the undergrad degree I should seek.

“Career-connected learning has given me the opportunity to explore both business and legal fields. The Wenatchee High School Mock Trial team has linked me to members of the legal community. Being surrounded by fellow driven students that value their futures and career possibilities is another benefit of career-connected learning.”

Kody Richards is a sophomore at Wenatchee High School and has a passion for Career and Technical Education and related student leadership organizations.

Full article

Education: Future needs, lingering gaps open 2019 session

The Lens, January 23, 2019

“More than 70 percent of jobs created by businesses in Washington require post-secondary credentials of all kinds, yet only 40 percent of Washington students go on to receive post-secondary credentials.

“‘We have a mismatch going on,” said Maud Daudon, project leader for Career Connect Washington, in the Early Learning and K-12 Committee on Wednesday. “We have people who need opportunity … and somehow we need to bring this together.'”

Full article

Vocational education is worth Inslee’s $110 million request

Tri-City Herald, January 18, 2019

“Gov. Jay Inslee and state education officials are trying to help by designating $110 million to promote vocational and technical education.

The money is worth it, and lawmakers should not hesitate to support this part of Inslee’s proposed state budget.

It will fund programs designed to connect students of all ages to careers they probably don’t know exist. The money will help boost apprenticeship programs at the high school level, and give students a chance to gain experience in a technical field before they graduate.

We’re talking hands-on experience with employers who are looking to fill jobs.”

Full article

Career-connected learning programs help students prepare for their futures

Wenatchee World, January 18, 2019

“Gov. Jay Inslee included $110 million in his budget for career-connected learning, — from K-12 through higher education and incumbent worker training. This kind of investment will allow younger children to learn about and explore the different jobs there are in the world; as they get older, they get more opportunities to spend time in work settings, helping them understand what kind of learning and preparation they need to achieve their own goals.

The budget investments will support school districts, businesses, community colleges and others who are working to help our young people get hands-on experience. Experts estimate that about 70 percent of the jobs that will open in the next five years will need qualifications beyond a high school diploma. We can help all our students be ready for these high-skill, high-paying jobs by giving them the chance to start their learning early.”

Full article

Governor features Career Connect Washington in State of the State

Columbia Basin Herald, January 16, 2019

“The Career Connect Washington initiative’s goal is to help connect students to a variety of pathways, including apprenticeships, certificates and degrees, and is a key part of Inslee’s education plan. ”

Full article

Editorial: How to fill 740,000 job openings in the state

Everett Herald, December 16, 2018

“Dwarfed by bigger-ticket items in Gov. Jay Inslee’s proposed $54.4 billion budget for the 2019-21 biennium released last week — including K-12 education, mental health services and environmental work — it would be easy to overlook some $110 million in spending.

“But that $110 million represents an investment that is key to the state’s continued strong economy, an investment that can help connect the state’s young adults in high school and after with the education, training and experience needed for fulfilling and well-paid careers.”

Full article

Inslee visits LWTech students in Kirkland to learn how Career Connect Washington has supported students

Kirkland Reporter, December 7, 2018

“Washington Gov. Jay Inslee visited the Lake Washington Institute of Technology … to meet with students and faculty and learn how Career Connect Washington has supported the school and students.

“Career Connect Washington is an initiative started by the governor to create a 10-year vision and strategic plan for a nation-leading career connected learning and apprenticeship system.”

Full article

‘Yes, it’s possible’: The time is now for the Legislature to better fund higher education

Seattle Times, November 30, 2018

“Recently, Gov. Jay Inslee’s Career Connect Washington Task Force unveiled a plan to expand work-based learning opportunities so students get real-world experience before graduating. This makes the case for higher-education funding even stronger.”

Full article

Washington voters don’t think schools prepare kids for careers. The state is trying to change that.

Seattle Times, October 31, 2018

“Four out of five voters say Washington state’s high schools and colleges are failing to teach students real-world skills, or truly prepare them for the workplace, according to a recent state poll.

“To try to better connect students with jobs, the state launched a public-private initiative in March called Career Connect Washington that aims to link high-school and college classes to jobs. One of the ideas: Allowing more high-school students to leave campus for paid internships at local businesses and in exchange, receive high-school credit.”

Full article

Apprenticeship program helps high schoolers learn vital skills for high-paying jobs

Marysville Globe, August 10, 2018

“Schools are finally listening to what local employers have been saying for years.

“That they need workers.

“Acro Machining Inc. of Marysville is working with the Aerospace Joint Apprenticeship Committee, or AJAC, to provide those workers.”

Full article

Avista provides Energy Pathways for students to explore career in energy industry

KXLY, July 17, 2018

“Eighteen Spokane area high school juniors and seniors are spending July discovering if a career in the energy field could be their pathway to a successful future. Through Avista’s inaugural Energy Pathways student career experience, the students are in classroom sessions with Avista experts from various technical and skilled trade fields, then the students are putting their learning into practice with hands-on activities including designing, planning and performing actual utility tasks.

“Part of the month long experience includes the students identifying positions of interest to them within Avista for job shadowing in the fields of alternative and emerging energy including wind, solar and battery technologies; energy efficiency and sustainability; engineering; and maintenance and operations of the energy system.”

Full article

Task force outlines next steps for bolstering apprenticeships, career-connected learning in Washington

WA Governor’s Office – Medium, February 20, 2018

“The task force’s recommendations come at a pivotal time for the Career Connect Washington initiative, a public-private partnership Inslee launched with the five-year goal of connecting 100,000 young people with employer internships, registered apprenticeships and other learning opportunities …”

Full article

Inslee awards $6 million to create apprenticeship and career connections for 29,000 youth in 11 communities

WA Governor’s Office – Medium, December 8, 2017

“Job shadowing, internships and apprenticeships are just a few of the career connections that will become available to 29,000 students thanks to $6.4 million in new Career Connect Washington grant funding…”

Full article

Governor Inslee announces new Career Connect Washington Task Force

Eastside Business Journal, June 3, 2017

“The first ever Governor’s Summit on Career Connected Learning in Redmond drew over 1,200 participants Wednesday as business, industry, education, and community leaders came together to discuss next steps to help more Washington young people prepare for high-demand careers…”

Full article

Please use the form below to contact us. You do not need to submit a message; however, please do fill in the “Subject” field to give us a better idea of your interest in Career Connect Washington. Thank you!


Please use the form below to contact us. You do not need to submit a message; however, please do fill in the “Subject” field to give us a better idea of your interest in Career Connect Washington. Thank you!